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Пишет see shy jo ([info]syn_joey_hess)
@ 2020-02-07 18:23:00


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arduino-copilot combinators

My framework for programming Arduinos in Haskell has two major improvements this week. It's feeling like I'm laying the keystone on this project. It's all about the combinators now.

Sketch combinators

Consider this arduino-copilot program, that does something unless a pause button is pushed:

paused <- input pin3
pin4 =: foo @: not paused
v <- input a1
pin5 =: bar v @: sometimes && not paused

The pause button has to be checked everywhere, and there's a risk of forgetting to check it, resulting in unexpected behavior. It would be nice to be able to factor that out somehow. Also, notice that it inputs from a1 all the time, but won't use that input when pause is pushed. It would be nice to be able to avoid that unnecessary work.

The new whenB combinator solves all of that:

paused <- input pin3
whenB (not paused) $ do
    pin4 =: foo
    v <- input a1
    pin5 =: bar v @: sometimes

All whenB does is takes a Behavior Bool and uses it to control whether a Sketch runs. It was not easy to implement, given the constraints of Copilot DSL, but it's working. And once I had whenB, I was able to leverage RebindableSyntax to allow if then else expressions to choose between Sketches, as well as between Streams.

Now it's easy to start by writing a Sketch that describes a simple behavior, like turnRight or goForward, and glue those together in a straightforward way to make a more complex Sketch, like a line-following robot:

ll <- leftLineSensed
rl <- rightLineSensed
if ll && rl
    then stop
    else if ll
        then turnLeft
        else if rl
            then turnRight
            else goForward

(Full line following robot example here)

TypedBehavior combinators

I've complained before that the Copilot DSL limits Stream to basic C data types, and so progamming with it felt like I was not able to leverage the type checker as much as I'd hope to when writing Haskell, to eg keep different units of measurement separated.

Well, I found a way around that problem. All it needed was phantom types, and some combinators to lift Copilot DSL expressions.

For example, a Sketch that controls a hot water heater certainly wants to indicate clearly that temperatures are in C not F, and PSI is another important unit. So define some empty types for those units:

data PSI
data Celsius

Using those as the phantom type parameters for TypedBehavior, some important values can be defined:

maxSafePSI :: TypedBehavior PSI Float
maxSafePSI = TypedBehavior (constant 45)

maxWaterTemp :: TypedBehavior Celsius Float
maxWaterTemp = TypedBehavior (constant 35)

And functions like this to convert raw ADC readings into our units:

adcToCelsius :: Behavior Float -> TypedBehavior Celsius Float
adcToCelsius v = TypedBehavior $ v * (constant 200 / constant 1024)

And then we can make functions that take these TypedBehaviors and run Copilot DSL expressions on the Stream contained within them, producing Behaviors suitable for being connected up to pins:

isSafePSI :: TypedBehavior PSI Float -> Behavior Bool
isSafePSI p = liftB2 (<) p maxSafePSI

isSafeTemp :: TypedBehavior Celsius Float -> Behavior Bool
isSafeTemp t = liftB2 (<) t maxSafePSI

(Full water heater example here)

BTW, did you notice the mistake on the last line of code above? No worries; the type checker will, so it will blow up at compile time, and not at runtime.

    • Couldn't match type ‘PSI’ with ‘Celsius’
      Expected type: TypedBehavior Celsius Float
        Actual type: TypedBehavior PSI Float

The liftB2 combinator was all I needed to add to support that. There's also a liftB, and there could be liftB3 etc. (Could it be generalized to a single lift function that supports multiple arities? I don't know yet.) It would be good to have more types than just phantom types; I particularly miss Maybe; but this does go a long way.

So you can have a good amount of type safety while using Copilot to program your Arduino, and you can mix both FRP style and imperative style as you like. Enjoy!


This work was sponsored by Trenton Cronholm and Jake Vosloo on Patreon.



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